Monthly Archives: March 2014

Say hello to River St. Press

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River St. Press

Bonnie Dodge and Patricia Santos Marcantonio announce the formation of River St. Press and exciting new projects are on the way.

Coming soon is “BILLIE NEVILLE TAKES A LEAP,” a new children’s book about a girl who dreams of becoming a daredevil like her hero Evel Knievel, who’s coming to town to jump the Snake River Canyon.

Be sure to watch our website, Riverstpress.com for new blogs on the writing life. And check our out Facebook page, River St. Press and Writing Resource at https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/River-St-Press-and-Writing-Resource/130894866962318 for more writing resources.

Join us on a new journey.

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Coming soon: ‘Billie Neville Takes a Leap’

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A new kids book coming soon

A new kids book coming soon

Billie Neville, Daredevil
Billie wants to be a daredevil, just like her hero Evel Knievel. She also wants a best friend. Riding “the best bike in the whole world,” she’s desperate to enter a bike jumping contest with three boys named The Meanies and show them her cool bike skills. When Evel comes to town to jump the Snake River Canyon, Billie learns she has to be a friend to make friends and that not all heroes have to soar over canyons.

By Bonnie Dodge and Patricia Santos Marcantonio

My best writing advice: Read good books, watch good movies, TV, plays

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You hear the advice a lot at writing conferences and in writing books. Read. Read. Read. As a lover of movies and writer of screenplays, to that advice I will add watch good movies, TV and plays.
Why? Because you learn so damn much about everything. Pacing. Voice. Conflict. Dialogue. Description. Character. In other words, what makes a good story. What makes good writing.
When I started writing a psychological thriller, I read Thomas Harris’ “Red Dragon” about four times. I saw how effective it was to tell both the stories of the antagonist and protagonist. For example, in the case of the killer Francis Dolarhyde we learned how he became a monster and at first feel for the abuse that turned him into one. It also ramped up the conflict when the hero and villain meet. In my book, “The Weeping Woman” (Sunbury Press) I also presented the story through the eyes of villain and the detective hunting her down to show their contrast and similarities.
For a great script taut as a drum, I read Brian Helgeland’s script, “L.A. Confidential” many times.
The power of voice I found in “Funeral for Horses” and “Fight Club.”
How profound point of view can be in “To Kill a Mockingbird.”
Most any Quentin Tarantino script shows off unique and fantastic dialogue.
In “Breaking Bad” and “The Sopranos” I discovered what makes a great character, namely Walter White and Tony Soprano.
For great writing pure and simple, any Tennessee Williams play.
Grace of language, damn great characters and heart wrenching plot was all found in William Styron’s “Sophie’s Choice.”
You get the picture.
As writers, we don’t want to imitate those other writers, but we should analyze what makes them so good. And hopefully, somewhere find our own voices.
As a bonus, we also get to read great books and watch great movies, TV and plays, which is okay with me.