Tag Archives: Patricia Santos Marcantonio

Sueño Street – ON SALE NOW

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Sueño Street, Now ON SALE at Amazon.com and Barnes and Noble (click on links to purchase)

by Patricia Santos Marcantonio (Author),‎ Mike Youngman (Illustrator)

2017-1390 Patricia Santos Sueno Street

On the walls of Sueño Street, a young Latino artist paints murals that come to life with tales of horror, suspense and nightmare.The stories include fresh telling of traditional Latino scares like La Llorona, the weeping woman, a doomed specter seeking her lost children in the night, and the Cucuy, the boogeyman who preys on children and fear. Other stories range in time and space. The real price of dead man’s shoes. New and ancient betrayals in a canyon of ancient petroglyphs. Space explorers discovering evil on an alien planet and in themselves. A wife beater who gets what he deserves. A woman willing to challenge a horrible evil for love. Differing in artistic style, the stories are weaved together by the consequences of actions, some deserved, others not. A graphic novel in homage to”Tales From The Crypt” and “Night Gallery” but with Latino flavor, culture and characters. Parental Discretion Is Advised

 

Patricia Santos Marcantonio comes from a family of storytellers.
They tell stories about their own past and traditions, tales about people they have met and things they have done, and all in a way that makes you want to keep listening and beg for more. That’s where she got her desire to write and tell stories of her own.
She earned a Bachelor of Science degree with distinction in mass communications from the University of Southern Colorado (now Colorado State University-Pueblo). She is an award-winning journalist and served as a Newspaper Association of America New Media Fellow.
Her children’s book, “Red Ridin’ in the Hood and Other Cuentos,” (Farrar, Straus and Giroux) won an Anne Izard Storyteller’s Choice Award; and earned several recommendations including: Commended Title – Americas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature; Starred review–American Library Association; Best Collections to Share – Wilde Awards; and recommendations from Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, Kirkus Reviews and Publishers Weekly. The book was also ranked among Amazon.com Latino children’s books best sellers.
She also co-authored “Voices From the Snake River Plain” and contributed to and edited “Hauntings From the Snake River Plain,” and co-wrote with Bonnie Dodge, “Billie Neville Takes a Leap.”

Her screenplays have won, placed or hit the top percentage in several contests, including MORE Women in Film, Screenwriting Expo 5, Women in Film Las Vegas, the Phoenix Film Festival contest, Reel Women of the West, Idaho Writers Guild and Cinestory.

Member of Dramatists Guild of America and Idaho Writers Guild

Latinidad mentions ‘Verdict in the Desert’

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Marcela Landres was kind enough to mention my new book, “Verdict in the Desert” in the most recent edition of her outstanding e-zine, Latinidad.

Marcela is the author of the e-book How Editors Think: The Real Reason They Rejected You, and is the publisher of Latinidad®, an award-winning e-zine chosen one of the 101 Best Web Sites for Writers by Writer’s Digest. As an editorial consultant, she helps writers get published by editing their work and advising them on how to manage their writing careers. Past clients include Daniel Jose Older, author of the New York Times bestseller Shadowshaper and Charles Rice-Gonzalez, award-winning author of Chulito. She was  formerly an editor at Simon & Schuster.

If you haven’t signed up for her newsletter or checked out her site, please do so.

Thank you, Marcela.

Marcela Landres

Public radio host talks about VERDICT IN THE DESERT

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Many thanks to Eric Ladau and Houston Public Media for the interview with me about VERDICT IN THE DESERT.

You can list to the interview at the following site:

http://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/articles/arts-culture/2016/04/26/147943/arte-publico-press-author-of-the-month-patricia-santos-marcantonio/

‘Verdict in the Desert’ coming in April

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My new novel “Verdict in the Desert” will be released April  30 by Arte Público Press, the nation’s largest and most established publisher of contemporary and recovery literature by U.S. Hispanic authors.

In the summer of 1959, everyone knows his place in Arizona. Michael Shaw is an alcoholic lawyer struggling with his reputation as the son of one of Mitchell County’s wealthiest, most successful attorneys. Toni Garcia, the first in her family to obtain a college degree, has returned to Borden, Arizona, because she’s worried about her father’s health. But as a Mexican American, she can’t get a teaching job in spite of her education and intellect. Their worlds collide when Michael is assigned to represent María Sánchez Curry in the bloody murder of her husband and Toni, desperate for work, accepts a job as the defendant’s interpreter.

María and Ben Curry’s tumultuous marriage was well documented by María’s many visits to the ER. The couple was also well-known at local bars, where they often drank to excess. But the killing of a white man by a Mexican woman—even in self-defense—is not permissible in a time when justice is determined by the good-old-boys’ club. Also unacceptable is the growing relationship between Michael and Toni, who fight to save María against all odds.

In this evocative exploration of class and race in 1950s America, Bobby Darin is on the juke box, Doris Day is on the silver screen and pink flamingos grace front yards. Former crime reporter Patricia Santos Marcantonio crafts a stirring tale of forbidden love in a world where democracy rules but due process and fair treatment aren’t as readily available on the wrong side of the tracks.

The novel was partly inspired by my days as a court reporter for a newspaper.

https://artepublicopress.com/product/verdict-in-the-desert/

“Tears for Llorona” is retelling of old Mexican ghost story

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llorona book

La Llorona is a Mexican ghost story passed on through generations about a horrifying weeping woman searching the night for her lost children. TEARS FOR LLORONA is a retelling of that tale.

Pregnant and unhappy, teenage Inez is sent to live with her grandmother. But Inez’s life changes when Abuelita tells of another troubled woman long ago. The story of Juanita who wept a river for her drowned husband and vows her daughter will never have cause to cry in a world of tears. But the promise leads to tragedy, and Juanita pays a terrible price.

The play brings the past and present together in a relevant tale of selfishness, love and redemption.

“Touching, hopeful, and hauntingly real, Patricia Santos Marcantonio captures the bittersweet struggle of a mother’s love in this stunning retelling of a popular Mexican ghost story.”

Bonnie Dodge, author of “Waiting”

Now on sale at Amazon.com $7.99

http://www.amazon.com/Tears-Llorona-Patricia-Marcantonio/dp/1517319668/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1443216730&sr=1-1&keywords=tears+for+llorona

The Ghost Sisters is everything you would want a YA novel to be’ HorrorAddicts.net review

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ghost sisters

Thanks to HorrorAddicts.net and David Watson for the great review of my YA book, “The Ghost Sisters and the Girl in Hallway B.”

For the full review go to http://www.horroraddicts.net

For lovers of horror, a new book, HORROR ADDICTS GUIDE TO LIFE

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Horror Addicts Guide to Life
I’m honored to be a contributor to a new fun, informative and very cool book, HORROR ADDICTS GUIDE TO LIFE. My piece is about how La Llorona scared and inspired me.
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Do you love the horror genre?
Do you look at horror as a lifestyle?
Do the “norms” not understand your love of the macabre?
Despair no longer, my friend, for within your grasp is a book written by those who look at horror as a way of life, just like you. This is your guide to living a horrifying existence. Featuring interviews with Midnight Syndicate, Valentine Wolfe, and The Gothic Tea Society.
Authors: Kristin Battestella, Mimielle, Emerian Rich, Dan Shaurette, Steven Rose Jr., Garth von Buchholz, H.E. Roulo, Sparky Lee Anderson, Mary Abshire, Chantal Boudreau, Jeff Carlson, Catt Dahman, Dean Farnell, Sandra Harris, Willo Hausman, Laurel Anne Hill, Sapphire Neal, James Newman, Loren Rhoads, Chris Ringler, Jessica Robinson, Eden Royce, Sumiko Saulson, Patricia Santos Marcantonio, J. Malcolm Stewart, Stoneslide Corrective, Mimi A. Williams, and Ron Vitale.
With art by Carmen Masloski and Lnoir.
Edited by David Watson
Cover artist Carmen Masloski

Now available at: HorrorAddicts.net

Whatever you write, be happy

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I had lunch with a woman who is also a writer and throughout I was struck by her love of what she was doing. She had no bloodthirsty goal to be on the New York Times Bestseller list or climb the lofty heights of the Amazon ranks. She wasn’t out to make sure that her writing was on all the Nooks and Kindles in the universe.
She just loved what she was doing. She was happy, and her happiness was comforting.
I will admit to you I’ve fallen into that unhappy underworld when I begin to wonder why the heck I’m not selling millions, okay maybe thousands, of books on Amazon or at Barnes & Noble, or why Hollywood hasn’t optioned any of my stories for big screen or little one, for that matter. These are times when my ego takes hold like a rope. But as I’ve grown older I have learned that pinning happiness on those two things alone will lead straight to unhappiness. It’s like high school when you wish the cutest guy would ask you out or that you make the cheerleader squad. When those two things don’t happen, you are in high school hell. Thankfully, high school is over.
And please don’t misunderstand me. I’m not knocking ambition. If your only goal is to sell lots of books, then I wish you all the happiness. Damn, if my books do hit no. 1, I certainly won’t be sad or turn down the royalty checks.
But I’m not going to be holding my breath either.
I’m just going to keep on writing and learning how to become a better writer because that’s why I began all this in the first place. I love to tell stories and create characters. I love to have someone read my writing and feel a bit of the emotions I felt when writing the words. Or have them say, ‘Hey, I know what that’s like.’ I like to make them laugh, cry, feel scared, or rewarded. I like them to think. Mostly, I pursue awhat Harper Lee wrote in “To Kill a Mockingbird,” “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view . . . until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.”
That gives me the greatest joy–giving people another point of view through my writing.
I’ve had my share of successes and I am grateful and lucky, but as in life, I have to realize there will always be people with more success and less success. People with more money and less. At times, I still have to work to keep myself out of that hades of unhappy writers, but it is getting easier and isn’t that something to be happy about?

Following is the link to the best list I’ve read about how to be a happy writer by novelist, screenwriter and game designer Chuck Wendig. Enjoy!
http://terribleminds.com/ramble/2013/03/26/25-ways-to-be-a-happy-writer-or-at-least-happier/?subscribe=success#blog_subscription-2

Add dedication to your writer’s tool box

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Make a list of all the tools you need to be a writer.
Let’s see, computer, paper, ideas, dictionary, and yes, dedication.
Those who challenged themselves in National Novel Writing Month in November, that is writing a 50,000 word novel in a month, have already learned this simple rule, philosophy or whatever you choose to call it. Namely, you must write everyday to make the goal. You must be dedicated.
But dedication is something you need year round as a writer, not just in November or for New Year’s resolutions.
You must be dedicated to finish your projects. Sure, you may have a few projects going, but be dedicated to completing one. Your novel, essay, poem or memoir–whatever you are writing–demands your dedication.
Be dedicated to writing something most every day, even if you go back and erase it the next day.
Be dedicated to becoming a better writer either by taking a class, going to a conference or getting involved with a critque group.
Dedication is tough because we sometimes must sacrifice other things, but a love of what you are doing makes dedication just another writer’s tool, just like your computer, paper and dictionary.